Resources and FAQs for All Graduate Students

For most questions about how your department or program will administer graduate education and associated academic activities in fall 2020, you should contact your department or program directly.  There will be variability in educational format across the Graduate School based on discipline and associated curricular and research requirements, as well as students’ year of study.  The questions and answers below are intended as general guidance based on currently available information, and they are subject to change. Such changes may be based on public health guidance or governmental regulation. Please check back for updates.

Academics & Enrollment

Will graduate courses be online in the fall?

This may depend on your program, on the specific course and its instructor, and on you.  Please check in with your department or program and with instructors of individual courses.  We anticipate that many graduate courses will be online, but graduate programs also have the option of conducting courses in person where possible. In-person courses would require that all participants wear face coverings and maintain appropriate degrees of social distancing per public health guidelines and governmental regulation. Hybrid options (where some students are present in person and others participate remotely) are also possible at the graduate level, depending on what individual programs decide.

I left the University in March and my fall term courses will be conducted remotely. Am I expected to return to campus?

You should first check in with your department or program about this.  The Graduate School expects that some aspects of graduate education will take place in person in some form, and facilities such as labs and the library system are reopening.  If you are able to return, you are both permitted and invited to do so.  It may be possible to remain remote as long as you, your adviser, and department or program have developed an acceptable plan for continued progress.  Bear in mind that such arrangements are temporary and in response to COVID-19, and students should have clear plans to return to campus over the course of the fall term if required by their academic and research activities. Please note that students currently residing in Iran, Syria, Cuba and North Korea are prohibited from taking U.S. graduate classes remotely. 

I am in a lab-based discipline. Will I be able to conduct research in the lab?

Effective June 17, 2020, academic departments and researchers who have received approval and completed the requirements to resume experimental work are being allowed to resume research in their labs.  If you are in a lab that has received approval, you may resume in-person research according to the approved plan put forward by your adviser.  Many everyday activities, including computation work, data analysis, project planning, and manuscript writing should continue to take place remotely. 

I am a student who left campus back in the spring due to COVID-19 and cannot return to campus for the fall. What should I do?

Some continuing students (students moving into their second year or higher) may not be able – or may find it difficult – to be present in person, either temporarily or for an extended period, because of a variety of legitimate reasons, including, for example, underlying health risks, travel restrictions, or caregiving duties. If you cannot be present in person and wish to remain enrolled, your department or program will work with you individually to determine possible remote accommodations for coursework, research obligations, and teaching assignments (if any).  You should be in touch with your DGS and adviser(s) about this. The Academic Affairs deans in the Graduate School can also assist in exploring options with you if you encounter difficulties. 

If I will not return to campus but will remain enrolled, should I be enrolled in absentia for the fall term?

In absentia status is reserved for students who require access to educational resources away from campus.  If you are away from campus primarily due to COVID-19-related reasons and will remain enrolled rather than take a leave of absence, then your enrollment status should be regular enrollment rather than in absentia enrollment.  Holding the status of regular enrollment while away for COVID-19-related reasons will make certain you do not encounter unnecessary restrictions.  For example, students enrolled in absentia are not eligible to take courses, to serve as assistants in instruction (AIs), or to be paid as assistants in research (ARs) for research tied to on-campus activities. 

Will Final Public Orals (FPOs – also referred to as dissertation defenses) happen in person or virtually? What about general exams?

Since mid-March, we have allowed FPOs and general exams to be conducted virtually.  That same flexibility will be in place for the fall semester and will not require any individual approvals.  Earlier this spring, we provided graduate program administrators with instructions on how best to facilitate virtual FPOs via Zoom, and we will redistribute those instructions prior to the fall.  In-person FPOs may also be possible beginning in the fall, but only if appropriate social distancing can occur for all who are participating.  Ph.D. students should consult their programs about options.

Can I participate in the IUDC cross-registration program or the Ivy Plus Exchange Scholar Program this fall?

Although Princeton is not approving any University-related travel, it may be possible for students to take classes remotely through one of our cross-registration exchange agreements. This must be reviewed and approved on an individual basis by both institutions, and there must be full agreement by the instructor before a student can proceed to enroll in the class. 

IUDC cross-registration program | Ivy Plus Exchange Scholar Program

What additional policies and supports are available to help enrolled graduate students facing COVID-19 absences this fall?

The Graduate School already has policies in place that provide enrolled graduate students with personal and sick leave and vacation time.  Due to the ongoing nature of the pandemic, however, graduate students may require additional time away from duties specifically for COVID-19-related issues.  The Policy Subcommittee of the Faculty Committee on the Graduate School recently reviewed and approved a temporary policy that guarantees graduate students a set number of days off from their regular duties for COVID-19-related issues.  This policy provides graduate students up to 14 days of time off for COVID-19-related issues, separate from and in addition to the time off they already have under our existing policies on personal and sick leave and on vacation time. The policy is available here

In addition to the new policy allowing for COVID-19 days, the Graduate School has developed a process to review exceptional situations where a graduate student remains concerned about whether a department can accommodate that student’s ongoing COVID-19-related absence in coursework, research, and/or teaching requirements after all existing accommodation procedures have been exhausted. We have developed an in-take process for review of requests for additional adjustments for any students who feel they need continued flexibility around in-person activities and such flexibility has not already been arranged. Given the high level of support that our faculty advisers provide their graduate students and the deep commitment that our graduate students themselves have to their fields, we expect that we will not need to make regular use of this process. But we want to be prepared to support all graduate students as necessary. If you would like a review of an exceptional situation after already consulting with your adviser(s) and DGS, please complete a COVID-19 accommodation request form.

Whom do I contact in the Graduate School with academic and enrollment matters?

For questions about academic matters and student enrollment, Geoffrey Hill is your point of contact for the humanities and social sciences. Christine Murphy is your normal point of contact for these types of questions in the natural sciences and engineering. Vanessa Gonzalez-Perez will also be supporting the natural sciences divisions this fall.

How do I order my course books for fall?

Per Registrar Polly Griffin’s email message to graduate students dated August 10:

Course book lists for fall term courses will be available on the Course Offerings website as well as Blackboard beginning on August 15. Princeton University students receive a 30 percent discount off the list price of all new and used course books bought through Labyrinth Books, the University's bookstore. Carefully review the new deadlines and procedures Labyrinth Books has established for Fall 2020 course books.  The window for ordering books opens on Saturday, August 15, which will allow Labyrinth to process the orders and mail them, if requested, in a timely fashion. Please note that two shipments via UPS are free this semester to students studying remotely. Labyrinth recommends that you order as many books as you know you will need in a single order early in the order window, especially if you are required to quarantine upon arrival or if you need books to be shipped. For information on in-town order delivery and pickup as well as some FAQ’s, please click here

If you would like to sell books back to Labyrinth, the store honors guaranteed buyback prices through the entire academic year. End-savings under the buyback program are 55% for new books and 62% for used books. Click here for full details.  Buybacks are currently suspended for the rush period and will resume on October 1, 2020.

 For further information about the purchasing tool and discount program, please visit the Course Books Purchasing section of the Dean of the College website.

I have questions about technology to support remote research and learning. Where can I find answers to questions about technology and resources that are available?

The Office of Information Technology (OIT) provides answers to questions frequently asked by graduate students about technology resources available to them in support of remote research and learning.  You can find FAQs and answers specific to graduate students on the OIT website. The questions and answers also address changes to IT services and resources for Fall 2020 that are a result of Covid-19 social distancing guidelines.

Finances & Funding

Will the University’s plans for undergraduate education in the fall affect my financial support as a graduate student?

You will continue to receive the financial support that was promised to you in either your admission offer (new students) or your annual financial support letter (continuing students). With the new academic calendar, the enrollment and funding cycles will advance as of August 1.  You will receive your first stipend check for the new academic year on the last business day of August (this year the payment date will be August 31st).

If you have any questions about your financial support for the fall, please reach out to your graduate program administrator.

What if I have an AI for the fall term? How will AI financial support be affected by the undergraduate plan?

Any AI assignment that you have for the fall term will continue as planned, with the AI pay beginning in August and running through December. The time commitment and pay associated with an AI assignment will not change. Your AI financial support will be coordinated with any other financial support that you are receiving from the University. Should there be an increase in the number of AIs hours assigned to you as a result of the undergraduate plan, your AI pay would be adjusted accordingly and coordinated with University support.

When will I receive my stipend check for the new academic year?

With the new academic calendar, the graduate student 12-month funding year begins August 1 and ends July 31.  You will receive your first stipend check for the new academic year on the last business day of August (this year the payment date will be August 31).

How will I receive my stipend paycheck from Princeton?

-Updated 8/10/20 9:15am-

The best way to ensure that you receive payments from the University quickly and securely is by enrolling in direct deposit with a US-based savings or checking account. To enroll in direct deposit, visit TigerHub.  If you do not have a US bank account, some financial institutions now have the ability to open new accounts remotely, and in certain cases, for students who are not in the US. You can find more information on these options here.  Once you access the website page, scroll down to the “Direct Deposit” section for more details. 

 While we strongly urge enrollment in direct deposit, we understand that there may be exceptional circumstances where establishment of a US bank account is not possible. Where these unique circumstances arise, the following protocol will be in place:

  • If you are a student located in the US, payment will be issued via check and will be mailed to the home address provided during academic year sign-in. Checks will not be available for pickup on campus.
  • If you are a student physically located outside of the US, and have been unable to establish a US bank account, please contact the Financial Service Center at finance@princeton.edu.
What are the University stipend rates for academic year 2020-21?

Fellowship and assistantship stipends for Academic Year 2020-21 are as follows:

University Fellowship (12 months)                                            $35,500

First Year Fellowship (10 months)                                             $30,800

Assistantship in Research (10 months)                                    $30,800

Assistantship in Instruction (10 months)                                $33,800

Will the time commitment and/or pay associated with an AI assignment change?

No. Your AI financial support will be coordinated with any other financial support that you are receiving from the University. Should there be an increase in the number of AI hours assigned to you as a result of the undergraduate plan, your AI pay would be adjusted accordingly and coordinated with University support.  No graduate student may be assigned more than 6 AI hours in a semester, which is considered a full AI appointment and provides a full stipend at the AI rate.  Because of adjustments to the number of students in most precepts and sections, each AI hour appointment should continue to represent approximately three hours of work per week: one contact hour with students plus approximately two hours of preparation and assessment time.  A full AI appointment of 6 AI hours should typically not exceed 18 to 20 hours of work per week. If you find that you are being asked to devote more time than is reasonable, you should discuss this with the faculty member with whom you teach and/or your DGS.  Academic Affairs staff in the Graduate School can offer an additional review of your situation as necessary.

Fall classes were originally scheduled to begin on September 2, but a proposed plan (pending faculty approval) has courses beginning two days earlier on August 31. How will this impact my AI assignment and pay?

Enrollment and funding cycles for continuing graduate students are already scheduled to advance as of August 1 under the new academic calendar.  August stipends will include AI pay for students serving as AIs for the fall semester. Graduate students serving as Assistants in Instruction (AIs) for the fall semester may be called upon by faculty to assist with undergraduate course preparation in August prior to the beginning of classes. 

My annual financial support letter does not reflect my departmental funding or the AI that I was promised. How do I know how much I will be paid in August?

Your annual financial support letter reflects the funding promised you at the time of reenrollment. If you subsequently received a fellowship award, external funding or were appointed as an AI, this would not be reflected. Your graduate program administrator will be able to confirm updates to your financial support.  Meghan Krause on the Graduate School Finance Team can serve as a resource for any questions regarding external fellowship awards.

I am in a master’s program and pay tuition. Will there be any discounts to my tuition bill?

-Updated 7/24/20 12:36pm-

There will not be any discounts to the tuition bill for graduate students.  Because every graduate student has been invited to campus for the full academic year, tuition charges will not be discounted.

Does the Graduate School have a fund for students experiencing financial hardship due to COVID-19?

Continuing students (students moving into their second year or higher) may be eligible to apply for funds from the COVID Hardship Fund. The Graduate School can provide limited financial assistance to graduate students with high financial need who are experiencing severe hardships related to COVID-19. If you would like to be considered for this emergency funding, please submit the following form.
 

Health & Wellness

Where can I find public health guidance regarding COVID-19?

Resources include the Princeton University Fall 2020 website's Health Guidance pagethe Princeton University COVID-19 website, as well as the Environmental Health and Safety website.

What resources exist for Health & Wellness issues related to COVID-19?

If you are experiencing any COVID-related symptoms, please call University Health Services UHS) at (609) 258-3141.

    Access the University Health Services COVID-19 Information Here.

     If you’re feeling stressed and would like to talk about it, please reach out to Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) to set up a virtual appointment with a counselor. If you need to speak with someone immediately, call CPS at any time: 609-258-3141. If you are experiencing an emergency, please call 911 immediately.

    Please also see the following resource regarding taking care of your mental health provided by UHS.

     

    What changes to the Student Health Plan (SHP) have been made in response to COVID-19?

    Information on updates to the Student Health Plan (SHP) in response to COVID-19 can be found here.

    What resources exist for graduate students experiencing health-related financial hardships?

    Any graduate students who experience health-related financial hardship are eligible to apply to the Medical Hardship Fund.

    What is the COVID-19 Leave Policy and where can I find more information?

    In addition to the ten days ordinarily available for illness or other personal matters, in academic year 2020-21 graduate students will be eligible for 14 COVID-19 days during this global health pandemic. These COVID-19 days are intended to assist graduate students who are temporarily unable to fulfill their responsibilities either on campus or remotely, because of hardships directly related to COVID-19. These could range from direct health effects of COVID-19 itself to other consequences, such as childcare issues caused by school closings or the need to care for a dependent who is impacted by COVID-19.

    Students who must be absent due to COVID-19 for longer than 14 days may be eligible for a separate short-term accommodation through the Graduate School or may request a leave of absence from the University. If a student holds an external fellowship whose terms may conflict with this policy, the student should consult first with the director of graduate studies or adviser.

    The COVID-19 leave policy for the 2020-21 academic year is available here.

    Housing & Dining

    Will I be able to move into my assigned housing in the fall of 2020?

    Yes, housing assignments will remain as issued. Questions on housing assignments can be addressed to askhousing@princeton.edu.

    What are the quarantine and isolation guidelines if I will be returning to on-campus housing?
    • All incoming and returning graduate students to campus housing will be required to complete the Covid-19 Risk Assessment form no earlier than one week before arriving on campus.
    • Both students currently returning to campus from an international destination, as well as students returning from certain US states that are currently experiencing a significant spread of COVID-19, must quarantine for 14 days after arriving in New Jersey. This list is updated regularly. If this advisory is still in effect in late August, students arriving to campus at that time from one of these states will be asked to quarantine in their room/residence for 14 days. 
    • The COVID-19 Risk Assessment form should be completed during the week prior to your return to campus (not before that week).  After reviewing your COVID-19 Risk Assessment, University Health Services (UHS) will notify you if you need to quarantine or not. If you are required to quarantine, UHS will notify you of the length of time you are required to quarantine and will provide instructions for self-quarantining.  If you have been in campus housing continuously since the spring 2020 semester, then you do not need to complete the COVID-19 Risk Assessment unless you have been explicitly instructed to do so through the Resumption of Research protocol. If you have been instructed to complete it, after doing so, University Health Services will notify you via email whether any further action is required on your part. 
    • If you are required to self-quarantine and you will live at the Graduate College, Annex, and RGS residence, you will self-quarantine in your residence. Dining Services will be in contact with you and will provide you meal services for the duration of your quarantine period. A member of the Graduate School will reach out to you to offer support.
    • If you are required to self-quarantine and you will live in Lakeside, Lawrence or 27-29 Edwards apartments, the expectation is that you will be able to self-quarantine in your apartment by following some simple hygiene guidelines. Dining Services will reach out to you should you require a box of non-perishable food items to sustain you during your quarantine period. A member of the Graduate School will reach out to you to offer support. For information regarding self-quarantine for students who are required to quarantine and their roommates who are not required to quarantine, please visit: https://www.princeton.edu/content/covid-19-coronavirus-faqs-graduate-stu...
    What are the quarantine and isolation guidelines if I currently live in on-campus housing?
    • If you are experiencing any COVID-19 related symptoms, please call University Health Services UHS) at (609) 258-3141.
       
    • If you are asked to go to UHS for COVID-19 testing and you currently live at Lakeside, Lawrence or 27-29 Edwards apartments, you will be asked to notify your roommates right away that you will be tested for COVID-19 (you’ll need to get the verbal consent of your roommates for you to self-isolate in the apartment, otherwise, we can provide you temporary housing on campus for your isolation period and meal services). After taking the test, you will receive self-isolation instructions, a care package and you will return to your apartment unless you express the need for temporary housing for self-isolation. Dining Services will reach out to you should you require a box of non-perishable food items to sustain you during the isolation period in your apartment. A member of the Graduate School will reach out to you and your roommates to offer support. You will receive a survey to assess your symptoms daily, and based on your responses a UHS clinician may check in on you by phone; also, you will be notified once your test results are available.
       
    • For information regarding self-isolation for students who are required to isolate and information for roommates (UHS will notify roommates whether they are required to self-quarantine or not based on contact tracing), please visit: https://www.princeton.edu/content/covid-19-coronavirus-faqs-graduate-stu... 
       
    • If you are asked to go to UHS for COVID-19 testing and you currently live at the Graduate College, Annex, or RGS residence, you will be asked to bring at least five to seven days of clothing, toiletries, any personal devices/chargers and medication with you to your UHS appointment. Following the COVID-19 test, you will receive self-isolation instructions, a care package and you will receive housing and meal services at a designated location on campus for the duration of your isolation period. A member of the G+CH team will be in contact with you for contact tracing – your close contacts will be notified to quarantine while your information will be kept confidential. A member of the Graduate School will reach out to you to check in and offer support. You will receive a survey to assess your symptoms daily, and based on your responses a UHS clinician may check in on you by phone; also, you will be notified once your COVID-19 test results are available.
       
    • If you are identified as a close contact of someone who is tested for COVID-19 you would need to quarantine. Please refer to the self-quarantining information noted above in this communication.
    Where can I go for information about Dining and Meal Plans?

    Please visit the Princeton Campus Dining website for the latest meal schedule details and information regarding the Emergency Summer Meal Plan

    Student Organizations & Activities

    Are student groups permitted hold in person events and/or activities?

    Student organizations are permitted and encouraged to host virtual events and activities. No in-person activity or group travel is permitted. As a reminder, all virtual events/activities must be registered by completing the online Events Registration Form

    Can student groups reserve space on campus?

    On-campus spaces, including but not limited to Lakeside, Lawrence, GC and Campus Club, will be unavailable to host events and activities.

    Is funding available for virtual programming?

    Student organizations are permitted to use their finances for approved virtual group activity. Student organizations may continue to request funding from the GSG Events Board for approved events.

    Can I start a new student organization?

    The recognition of new student organizations will continue with no change to the recognition process.  

    Incoming Graduate Students

    Can I begin my program remotely? What if I am an international student and do not have a visa?

    This will depend on your program and the types of research and educational activities specific to it.  You should check in first with your program.  Additionally, graduate students who are approved to start remotely must have the ability to lawfully complete financial transactions with the University, which may include receiving a stipend and/or paying tuition.  If you are an international student and do not have a visa, there are additional considerations.  We believe that early August would be the soonest we could make any determinations about the possibility for international graduate students to start remotely without a visa.  For the time being, incoming international graduate students are directed to do all they can to secure a visa and to stay in close contact with the Davis International Center about their visa situation as we work to determine what may be possible.

    I think I am approved as an Early Arrival new incoming student. How do I know for sure, and what do I need to do when I arrive to campus?

    Please be in contact with your department’s Graduate Program Administrator to confirm, and follow the steps provided on the Check-in List that you should have received.

    I have questions on my arrival and enrollment for the fall. Where can I find answers?

    Incoming students may find most information relevant to their arrival plans on our incoming students page.

    I would like to request a deferral. What is the deadline to submit my request?

    For Fall 2020, the Graduate School will accept deferral requests until August 20. We suggest waiting to make a deferral request until you explore all options with your program and, as relevant, the Davis International Center.  

    When will I receive my first stipend check?

    With the new academic calendar, the graduate student funding year begins August 1 and ends July 31.  As an incoming student, you will receive your first full stipend check at the end of August. Payment is made on the last business day of the month (this year the payment date will be August 31). If you have any questions about your financial support for the fall term, please reach out to your graduate program administrator.

    If I am starting remotely as a first-year student will I receive a stipend?

    If you are enrolled and approved to start your program remotely, you will receive the same funding package as other first-year students in your program.  

    How do I order my course books for fall?

    Per Registrar Polly Griffin’s email message to graduate students dated August 10:

    Course book lists for fall term courses will be available on the Course Offerings website as well as Blackboard beginning on August 15. Princeton University students receive a 30 percent discount off the list price of all new and used course books bought through Labyrinth Books, the University's bookstore. Carefully review the new deadlines and procedures Labyrinth Books has established for Fall 2020 course books.  The window for ordering books opens on Saturday, August 15, which will allow Labyrinth to process the orders and mail them, if requested, in a timely fashion. Please note that two shipments via UPS are free this semester to students studying remotely. Labyrinth recommends that you order as many books as you know you will need in a single order early in the order window, especially if you are required to quarantine upon arrival or if you need books to be shipped. For information on in-town order delivery and pickup as well as some FAQ’s, please click here

    If you would like to sell books back to Labyrinth, the store honors guaranteed buyback prices through the entire academic year. End-savings under the buyback program are 55% for new books and 62% for used books. Click here for full details.  Buybacks are currently suspended for the rush period and will resume on October 1, 2020.

     For further information about the purchasing tool and discount program, please visit the Course Books Purchasing section of the Dean of the College website.

    Travel

    My academic work requires that I travel.  Is this allowed?

    Currently all University-sponsored research travel is prohibited, and all personal travel is discouraged.  Until this changes, you should not plan to travel, and you may need to discuss adjusting research timelines or research topics with your adviser(s).

    Further information about travel guidelines can be found on the University's COVID-19 Information Page.

    I am an international student. Where can I find regular updates on travel restrictions and the global travel landscape?

    We recognize there may be additional challenges facing international students with regard to travel to the U.S. and that some students may be unable to come to campus in the fall due to visa issues or travel restrictions. The Davis International Center posts regular updates on restrictions and the global travel landscape and is making every effort to share information as soon as it becomes available in order to assist international students. For specific questions, graduate students should reach out to the Davis Center.

    For additional information, consult the International Princeton website.

    International Graduate Students

    Where can I find regular updates on travel restrictions and the global travel landscape?

    We recognize there may be additional challenges facing international students with regard to travel to the U.S. and that some students may be unable to come to campus in the fall due to visa issues or travel restrictions. The Davis International Center posts regular updates on restrictions and the global travel landscape and is making every effort to share information as soon as it becomes available in order to assist international students. For specific questions, graduate students should reach out to the Davis Center.

    Please also consult the University's Fall 2020 page for further guidance.

    For additional information, consult the International Princeton website.

    Are international graduate students able to begin their programs remotely?

    International graduate students who are approved to start remotely must have the ability to lawfully complete financial transactions with the University, which may include receiving a stipend and/or paying tuition.  If you are an international student and do not have a visa, there are additional considerations.  We believe that early August would be the soonest we could make any determinations about the possibility for international graduate students to start remotely without a visa.  For the time being, incoming international graduate students are directed to do all they can to secure a visa and to stay in close contact with the Davis International Center about their visa situation as we work to determine what may be possible.

    Libraries

    Where can I find the latest information about accessing a Princeton library via on-site services and/or remote resources?

    Please visit the Princeton University Library website for the latest communications containing information on the phased resumption of on-site services and updates about remote resources.

    Teaching & AI Appointments

    If undergraduate courses will primarily be taught online for the fall semester, how do I prepare to teach online?

    For first-time AIs, the McGraw Center’s mandatory AI Orientation for the fall semester will be held virtually in the month of August and will include resources for online teaching.  Your graduate program administrator is your point of contact for registering for this orientation.  For all AIs, new and veteran, the McGraw Center has developed valuable resources for teaching online.  Additionally, the McGraw Center will offer workshops, learning forums, and consultations in preparation for and during the fall semester.

    How large will the precepts or sections be in undergraduate courses taught online?

    The number of students you teach as an AI in a precept or section will vary depending on decisions that departments and programs make about the right sizes for their various courses.  In most cases, however, the number of students in an online precept or section is likely to be fewer than 10. This may result in additional AI opportunities for graduate students who are seeking funding support in their later years of enrollment or who are seeking additional teaching experience.

    Will the time commitment and/or pay associated with an AI assignment change?

    No. Your AI financial support will be coordinated with any other financial support that you are receiving from the University. Should there be an increase in the number of AI hours assigned to you as a result of the undergraduate plan, your AI pay would be adjusted accordingly and coordinated with University support.  No graduate student may be assigned more than 6 AI hours in a semester, which is considered a full AI appointment and provides a full stipend at the AI rate.  Because of adjustments to the number of students in most precepts and sections, each AI hour appointment should continue to represent approximately three hours of work per week: one contact hour with students plus approximately two hours of preparation and assessment time.  A full AI appointment of 6 AI hours should typically not exceed 18 to 20 hours of work per week. If you find that you are being asked to devote more time than is reasonable, you should discuss this with the faculty member with whom you teach and/or your DGS.  Academic Affairs staff in the Graduate School can offer an additional review of your situation as necessary.

    If some precepts or sections may be scheduled to accommodate undergraduates in different time zones, will I be asked to teach at unusual times?

    This will depend on the course and the students in it.  Departments and programs have been instructed to discuss any unusual times with AIs to make sure they are comfortable with teaching outside of ordinary hours before they are assigned them.  In all cases departments and programs should avoid asking an AI to teach between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. local to where the AI is for the fall semester.

    I have questions about technology to support teaching as an Assistant in Instruction. Where can I find answers to questions about technology and resources that are available?

    The Office of Information Technology (OIT) provides answers to questions frequently asked by graduate students about technology resources available to them in support of teaching as an Assistant in Instruction (AI). You can find FAQs and answers specific to graduate students on the OIT website. The questions and answers also address changes to IT services and resources for Fall 2020 that are a result of Covid-19 social distancing guidelines.

    On-Campus and Virtual Resources for Graduate Students

    Pages

    Contact Information

    Clio Hall Princeton, NJ 08544
    Phone: 609-258-3030
    Fax: 609-258-6180
    Office Hours: 8:45 a.m.–5 p.m. (regular hours); 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. (summer hours)

    *Please note that, as described in the resource section, as well as in communications from the Graduate School archived on this site, your first point of contact on many questions will be your department.*

    Points of Contact for Graduate Students in the Humanities and Social Sciences

    • Nicole Barkley

      • Nicole Barkley
        • Assistant Dean for Student LIfe
      • Phone: 609-258-3643
      • Email: nbarkley@princeton.edu
    • Geoffrey B. Hill

      • Geoffrey B. Hill
        • Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs
      • Phone: 609-258-2066
      • Email: gbhill@princeton.edu
    • Rayna Truelove

      • Rayna Truelove
        • Assistant Dean for Access, Diversity and Inclusion
      • Phone: 609-258-1328
      • Email: truelove@princeton.edu
    • James M. Van Wyck

      • James M. Van Wyck
        • Assistant Dean for Professional Development
      • Phone: 609-258-2134
      • Email: jvanwyck@princeton.edu

    Points of Contact for Graduate Students in Engineering and Natural Sciences

    • Christine Fecenko Murphy

    • Vanessa Gonzalez-Perez

      • Vanessa Gonzalez-Perez
        • Assistant Dean Diversity Initiatives in the Natural Sciences
      • Phone: 609-258-9623
      • Email: vanessagp@princeton.edu
    • Amy Pszczolkowski

      • Amy Pszczolkowski
        • Assistant Dean for Professional Development
      • Phone: 609-258-9675
      • Email: alp19@princeton.edu
    • Lily Secora

      • Lily Secora
        • Assistant Dean for Student Life
      • Phone: 609-258-3029
      • Email: lsecora@princeton.edu

    Finances and Administration Contacts for all Graduate Students

    • Mary Bechler

        • Senior Associate Dean for Finance and Administration
      • Phone: 609-258-7510
      • Email: mbechler@princeton.edu
    • Jeanette DeGuire

        • Finance Coordinator
      • Phone: 609-258-2449
      • Email: jdeguire@princeton.edu
    • Lisa Franzman

        • Finance Specialist
      • Phone: 609-258-3037
      • Email: franzman@princeton.edu
    • Matthew Gundy

        • Assistant Director, Finance and Business Analyst
      • Email: mgundy@princeton.edu
    • Jacqueline Knowlton

        • Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration
      • Phone: 609-258-1999
      • Email: jjk3@princeton.edu
    • Meghan Krause

        • Finance Specialist
      • Phone: 609-258-7029
      • Email: mkrause@princeton.edu