Resources and FAQs for All Graduate Students

For most questions about how your department or program will administer graduate education and associated academic activities for academic year 2020-21, you should contact your department or program directly.  There will be variability in educational format across the Graduate School based on discipline and associated curricular and research requirements, as well as students’ year of study.  The questions and answers below are intended as general guidance based on currently available information, and they are subject to change. Such changes may be based on public health guidance or governmental regulation. Please check back for updates.

Academics & Enrollment

Is there required asymptomatic testing for Covid-19 for graduate students?

-Updated 3/4/2021-

Yes, there is mandatory asymptomatic testing for all grad students who meet any of the below testing criteria. Please see the University's policy for more details. 

  • Are physically on campus for 8 or more hours on a weekly basis
  • Live in University housing
  • Attend an in-person class of any duration

The Office of the Dean of the Graduate School will monitor testing compliance and follow steps of progressive discipline for any graduate student found to be willfully out of compliance or neglectful with adhering to the University’s COVID-19 testing protocol. The range of penalties for violations include those found in Rights, Rules, Responsibilities .

There are legitimate reasons for “non-compliance” which will not be treated as discipline issues.  Examples include but are not be limited to: a student who misses being COVID-19 tested because they were away that week, were sick, or otherwise were not on campus for 8 hours that week. Nonetheless, non-compliance will require follow-up and review to determine if legitimate or not, and then if not legitimate, the discipline procedures will be followed.

DAILY SYMPTOM CHECK

All graduate students must complete the Daily Symptom Check each day before they come to campus or enter a University building that is not their residence. They do not need to complete the Daily Symptom Check if they are not planning to be in University buildings, such as staying in their dormitory or other on campus housing.

The new Daily Symptom Check requires login with your NetID and password, with dual authentication via DUO. The new system has a compliance feature that sends a reminder if you enter a University building without completing a Daily Symptom Check and notifies the Graduate School if you still do not complete it. The system also alerts Environmental Health and Safety if a person enters a University building after being advised by the app to stay home.

How to Access and Use the Daily Symptom Check

The new app is located in the same place in TigerSafe as the previous Daily Symptom Check. Open TigerSafe, select Daily Symptom Check, and press the Daily Symptom Check button. If you prefer to use a tablet or computer, go to https://tinyurl.com/PrincetonSymptomCheckApp. See Daily Symptom Check on the EHS website for more information, including screenshots of the system.

After logging into the app, if you have none of the symptoms listed, select No and submit. You will receive a message with a green checkmark and message informing you that you are free to enter University buildings. If you select Yes, you will be prompted to answer additional questions about your symptoms, including whether any of the symptoms are related to a chronic or confirmed condition for which you are being treated. Graduate students may be informed that they should contact University Health Services if they are experiencing symptoms. 

Your result may indicate that you should stay home and will provide additional instructions and guidance. Entering a University building is an attestation that you do not have symptoms related to COVID-19. See Daily Symptom Check on the EHS website for more information, including screenshots of the system.

If you are unable to access the Daily Symptom Check with a smartphone, tablet, or computer, you may use the paper form.

 Use of the Daily Symptom Check ensures compliance with New Jersey Executive Order 192 for faculty, staff, and researchers, and ensures compliance with New Jersey Restart Standards for higher education for undergraduate and graduate students. 

 

SELF-REPORT COVID TESTING ABSENCE

The Self-Report COVID Testing Absence Form allows individuals who participate in the COVID-19 asymptomatic screening program to report ahead of time that they will miss one or more tests, and the reasons for missing testing. Therefore, graduate students are asked to complete this form as soon as they know they will be missing required on-campus testing. Responses to this form will be integrated into the weekly testing compliance report that the Graduate School receives.

Accessing and Using the Self-Report COVID Testing Absence Form

The form is available in the TigerSafe app and on the web. From the TigerSafe app, select Testing Kit and choose the Report a Testing Absence option. Alternatively, from any internet browser, go to https://tinyurl.com/PrincetonTestAbsence.

 Log in with your Princeton University NetID and password. Enter the start and end dates of your absence from testing, and select the reason for the absence. See the Report a Testing Absence web page for more information, including screenshots.

I plan to come to campus this spring. Will I be required to quarantine?

-Updated 3/25/2021-

Graduate students are required to abide by COVID-19 policies.  Graduate students are expected to follow the steps below when arriving on campus and to the Princeton area.  This includes students coming to campus for the first time and those returning to campus.

Processes for Graduate Student Arrival 

  • Graduate students who took part in the testing protocol in the fall and did not travel out of state will continue their participation in the protocol. 
  • Those graduate students who are coming back to Princeton after travel must complete the COVID Risk Assessment Form (link to form is: https://veoci.com/veoci/p/form/r996ddge9bzz#tab=entryFormwithin) within the 3-7 days prior to their arrival back at Princeton and may be required to quarantine for 10 days. Students will receive guidance to their responses to the COVID Risk Assessment Form from Global and Community Health at UHS. Until a student receives this guidance, they should assume that they should be in quarantine. Guidelines for students in quarantine are here: https://uhs.princeton.edu/sites/uhs/files/Fact-Sheet-Quarantine-for-Students.pdf
  • Those graduate students who are coming to the campus for the first time or for the first time this academic year will need to complete the COVID Risk Assessment Form (link to form is: https://veoci.com/veoci/p/form/r996ddge9bzz#tab=entryFormwithin) 3-7 days prior to their arrival back at Princeton and may be required to quarantine for 10 days.  Students will receive guidance to their responses to the COVID Risk Assessment Form from Global and Community Health at UHS. Until a student receives this guidance, they should assume that they should be in quarantine. Guidelines for students in quarantine are here: https://uhs.princeton.edu/sites/uhs/files/Fact-Sheet-Quarantine-for-Students.pdf
  • As soon as students are able (after quarantine for those whom it is required), they will begin to take part in regular COVID-19 testing administered by the University. Students will complete supervised sample collection at least twice at the Testing Clinic during open hours, and can then begin doing sample self-collection at home. Taking the first two tests in person will allow students to be taken through the entire testing process, from registering a kit to supplying a sample and dropping it off, under the guidance of a trained staff member. This will help reduce mistakes in the testing process and ensure the student will receive their results. 
Will graduate courses be online in the spring?

-Updated 12/18/2020-

This may depend on your program, on the specific course and its instructor, and on you.  Please check in with your department or program and with instructors of individual courses.  We anticipate that many graduate courses will be online, but graduate programs also have the option of conducting courses in person where possible. In-person courses would require that all participants wear face coverings and maintain appropriate degrees of social distancing per public health guidelines and governmental regulation. Hybrid options (where some students are present in person and others participate remotely) are also possible at the graduate level, depending on what individual programs decide.

I left the University in March 2020 and remained remote for the fall 2020 semester. Am I expected to return to campus for the spring 2021 semester? What should I do?

-Updated 12/18/2020-

You should first check in with your department or program about this.  The Graduate School expects that some aspects of graduate education will take place in person in some form, and facilities such as labs and the library system are reopening.  If you are able to return, you are both permitted and invited to do so.  It may be possible to remain remote as long as you, your adviser, and department or program have developed an acceptable plan for continued progress.  Bear in mind that such arrangements are temporary and in response to COVID-19, and students should have clear plans to return to campus over the course of the spring term if required by their academic and research activities. Please note that students currently residing in Iran, Syria, Cuba, North Korea, and the Crimea Region of Ukraine are prohibited from taking U.S. graduate classes remotely

Additionally, some continuing students (students moving into their second year or higher) may not be able – or may find it difficult – to be present in person, either temporarily or for an extended period, because of a variety of legitimate reasons, including, for example, underlying health risks, travel restrictions, or caregiving duties. If you cannot be present in person and wish to remain enrolled, your department or program will work with you individually to determine possible remote accommodations for coursework, research obligations, and teaching assignments (if any).  You should be in touch with your DGS and adviser(s) about this. The Academic Affairs deans in the Graduate School can also assist in exploring options with you if you encounter difficulties.

I am in a lab-based discipline. Will I be able to conduct research in the lab?

Effective June 17, 2020, academic departments and researchers who have received approval and completed the requirements to resume experimental work are being allowed to resume research in their labs.  If you are in a lab that has received approval, you may resume in-person research according to the approved plan put forward by your adviser.  Many everyday activities, including computation work, data analysis, project planning, and manuscript writing should continue to take place remotely. 

I’m in a non-lab based discipline and I’m finding it difficult to make progress remotely. Am I able to conduct my research on campus?

-New 12/18/2020-

The University is prioritizing the return to campus of graduate students whose living conditions are a major impediment to their work.   

Theoretical/computational graduate students in the divisions of natural sciences and engineering should discuss their situation with their adviser/PI. Individual advisers/PIs will be responsible for formulating plans that may allow graduate students' return to their departmental offices under conditions that satisfy strict health and safety protocols.

Graduate students in the humanities and social sciences should inform their department manager. Departments will develop eligibility criteria and plans for managing appropriate spaces in support of academics and research, under conditions that satisfy strict health and safety protocols.

If I will not return to campus but will remain enrolled, should I be enrolled in absentia for the spring 2021 term?

-Updated 12/18/2020-

In absentia status is reserved for students who require access to educational resources away from campus.  If you are away from campus primarily due to COVID-19-related reasons and will remain enrolled rather than take a leave of absence, then your enrollment status should be regular enrollment rather than in absentia enrollment.  Holding the status of regular enrollment while away for COVID-19-related reasons will make certain you do not encounter unnecessary restrictions.  For example, students enrolled in absentia are not eligible to take courses, to serve as assistants in instruction (AIs), or to be paid as assistants in research (ARs) for research tied to on-campus activities. 

Will Final Public Orals (FPOs – also referred to as dissertation defenses) happen in person or virtually? What about general exams?

Since mid-March of 2020, we have allowed FPOs and general exams to be conducted virtually.  That same flexibility will be in place for the spring semester and will not require any individual approvals. We provided graduate program administrators with instructions on how best to facilitate virtual FPOs via Zoom, and have redistribute those instructions prior to the fall.  In-person FPOs may also be possible, but only if appropriate social distancing can occur for all who are participating.  Ph.D. students should consult their programs about options.

Can I participate in the IUDC cross-registration program or the Ivy Plus Exchange Scholar Program this spring?

-Updated 12/18/2020-

Although Princeton is not approving any University-related travel, it may be possible for students to take classes remotely through one of our cross-registration exchange agreements. This must be reviewed and approved on an individual basis by both institutions, and there must be full agreement by the instructor before a student can proceed to enroll in the class. 

IUDC cross-registration program | Ivy Plus Exchange Scholar Program

What additional policies and supports are available to help enrolled graduate students facing COVID-19 absences this spring?

The Graduate School already has policies in place that provide enrolled graduate students with personal and sick leave and vacation time.  Due to the ongoing nature of the pandemic, however, graduate students may require additional time away from duties specifically for COVID-19-related issues.  The Policy Subcommittee of the Faculty Committee on the Graduate School recently reviewed and approved a temporary policy that guarantees graduate students a set number of days off from their regular duties for COVID-19-related issues.  This policy provides graduate students up to 14 days of time off for COVID-19-related issues, separate from and in addition to the time off they already have under our existing policies on personal and sick leave and on vacation time. The policy is available here

In addition to the new policy allowing for COVID-19 days, the Graduate School has developed a process to review exceptional situations where a graduate student remains concerned about whether a department can accommodate that student’s ongoing COVID-19-related absence in coursework, research, and/or teaching requirements after all existing accommodation procedures have been exhausted. We have developed an in-take process for review of requests for additional adjustments for any students who feel they need continued flexibility around in-person activities and such flexibility has not already been arranged. Given the high level of support that our faculty advisers provide their graduate students and the deep commitment that our graduate students themselves have to their fields, we expect that we will not need to make regular use of this process. But we want to be prepared to support all graduate students as necessary. If you would like a review of an exceptional situation after already consulting with your adviser(s) and DGS, please complete a COVID-19 accommodation request form.

Whom do I contact in the Graduate School with academic and enrollment matters?

For questions about academic matters and student enrollment, Geoffrey Hill is your point of contact for the humanities and social sciences. Christine Murphy is your normal point of contact for these types of questions in the natural sciences and engineering. Vanessa Gonzalez-Perez will also be supporting the natural sciences divisions this academic year.

I have questions about technology to support remote research and learning. Where can I find answers to questions about technology and resources that are available?

-Updated 12/18/2020-

The Office of Information Technology (OIT) provides answers to questions frequently asked by graduate students about technology resources available to them in support of remote research and learning.  You can find FAQs and answers specific to graduate students on the OIT website. The questions and answers also address changes to IT services and resources for spring 2021 that are a result of Covid-19 social distancing guidelines.

Where can I find and sign up for study spaces outside of my housing?

-Updated 2/5/2021-

Study spaces are available for graduate students to reserve. For guidelines and reservations, please visit the EMS website. The University will continue to add reservable spaces to this system as additional locations that are suitable for this need are identified.

Space in academic departments may also be an option.  Theoretical/computational graduate students in the divisions of natural sciences and engineering should discuss their situation with their adviser/PI. Individual advisers/PIs will be responsible for formulating plans that may allow graduate students' return to their departmental offices under conditions that satisfy strict health and safety protocols.

Graduate students in the humanities and social sciences should inform their department manager. Departments will develop eligibility criteria and plans for managing appropriate spaces in support of academics and research, under conditions that satisfy strict health and safety protocols.

Students may study in lobbies, atria and other common spaces as well as select classrooms within these buildings:

  • East Pyne
  • Friend Center
  • Frist Campus Center
  • Julis Romo Rabinowitz/Louis A. Simpson 
  • Lewis Arts complex
  • Lewis Library
  • McDonnell
  • Robertson

Students may access these buildings with their PUID cards between 6:45 a.m. and midnight each day. These spaces do not require advanced reservation. All other graduate student access should remain unchanged from the fall.

The Library will continue its study-browse service to allow students and faculty to reserve a seat or browse the stacks at several locations through a reservation system. Study spaces in Frist and East Pyne that were available by reservation only during the fall semester, will now be available on a first come, first serve basis, during the hours the buildings are open.  There will also be some additional study spaces made available in JRR/LAS.  Details on which spaces are available will be posted inside each building.

All students must abide by the public health regulations and university policies (including wearing masks, heeding capacity limits, practicing physical distancing and following cleaning protocols) while accessing these spaces and failure to do so may result in disciplinary sanctions. 

I completed Academic Year Sign- In this fall. Why am I being asked to complete it again this spring?

-New 12/18/2020-

In order for the University to have a good understanding of the physical locations of all students, including those here on campus and those studying remotely, we are requiring all students to complete Spring Term Sign-In.  During this process you will be asked to provide your physical location. This process must be completed by January 31, 2021, in order for you to continue to be enrolled and supported this spring.

I just arrived on campus and have an immunization hold that is preventing me from enrolling in courses. What should I do?

-New 12/18/2020-

Students arriving on campus are required to have up-to-date immunizations.  If you have an immunization hold, please be in touch with McCosh Health Center to resolve the immunization hold.  Students studying remotely will not have the immunization hold placed on their records.

I am a Ph.D. student whose research has been slowed because of Covid-19. Will I be eligible for an enrollment extension?

-New 12/18/2020-

Ph.D. students who research has been slowed because of Covid-19 may be eligible for up to a one-year extension of enrollment after their final year of DCE status eligibility if their department determines that such an extension is necessaryThe Graduate School has strongly encouraged departments to advise affected Ph.D. students to adjust or reframe their research in ways that make it possible for them to make progress on and complete a dissertation in the current environment.

Finances & Funding

Will the University’s plans for undergraduate education in the spring term affect my financial support as a graduate student?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

You will continue to receive the financial support that was promised to you in either your admission offer (first-year students) or your annual financial support letter (continuing students).

If you have any questions about your financial support for the spring, please reach out to your graduate program administrator.

What if I have an AI for the spring term? How will AI financial support be affected by the undergraduate plan?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

Any AI assignment that you have for the spring term will continue as planned, with the AI pay beginning in January and running through May. The time commitment and pay associated with an AI assignment will not change. Your AI financial support will be coordinated with any other financial support that you are receiving from the University. Should there be an increase in the number of AI hours assigned to you as a result of the undergraduate plan, your AI pay would be adjusted accordingly and coordinated with University support.

When will I receive my stipend check?

-Updated 12/15/2020)-

The spring term begins January 1. You will receive your first stipend check for the spring term on the last business day of the month, January 29th.

How will I receive my stipend paycheck from Princeton?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

The best way to ensure that you receive payments from the University quickly and securely is by enrolling in direct deposit with a US-based savings or checking account. To enroll in direct deposit, visit TigerHub. If you do not have a US bank account, some financial institutions now have the ability to open new accounts remotely, and in certain cases, for students who are not in the US. You can find more information on these options here. Once you access the website page, scroll down to the “Direct Deposit” section for more details. 

 While we strongly urge enrollment in direct deposit, we understand that there may be exceptional circumstances where establishment of a US bank account is not possible. Where these unique circumstances arise, the following protocol will be in place:

  • If you are a student located in the US, payment will be issued via check and will be mailed to the home address provided during academic year sign-in. Checks will not be available for pickup on campus.
  • If you are a student physically located outside of the US, and have been unable to establish a US bank account, please contact the Financial Service Center at finance@princeton.edu.
What are the University stipend rates for academic year 2020-21?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

Fellowship and assistantship stipends for Academic Year 2020-21 are as follows:

University Fellowship (12 months)                                            $35,500

First Year Fellowship (10 months)                                             $30,800

Assistantship in Research (10 months)                                    $30,800

Assistantship in Instruction (10 months)                                $33,800

Will the time commitment and/or pay associated with an AI assignment change?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

No. Your AI financial support will be coordinated with any other financial support that you are receiving from the University. Should there be an increase in the number of AI hours assigned to you as a result of the undergraduate plan, your AI pay would be adjusted accordingly and coordinated with University support. No graduate student may be assigned more than 6 AI hours in a semester, which is considered a full AI appointment and provides a full stipend at the AI rate. Each AI hour appointment represents approximately three hours of work per week: one contact hour with students plus approximately two hours of preparation and assessment time. A full AI appointment of 6 AI hours should not exceed 18 to 20 hours of work per week. If you find that you are being asked to devote more time than is reasonable, you should discuss this with the faculty member with whom you teach and/or your DGS. Academic Affairs staff in the Graduate School can offer an additional review of your situation as necessary.

Spring classes are scheduled to begin on February 1st. Why does my AI assignment and pay begin in January?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

January stipends will include AI pay for students serving as AIs for the spring semester. Graduate students serving as Assistants in Instruction (AIs) for the spring semester may be called upon by faculty to assist with undergraduate course preparation in January prior to the beginning of classes.

My annual financial support letter does not reflect my departmental funding or the AI that I was promised. How do I know how much I will be paid?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

Your annual financial support letter reflects the funding promised you at the time of reenrollment. If you subsequently received a fellowship award, external funding or were appointed as an AI, this would not be reflected. Your graduate program administrator will be able to confirm updates to your financial support.  Meghan Krause on the Graduate School Finance Team can serve as a resource for any questions regarding external fellowship awards.

I am in a master’s program and pay tuition. Will there be any discounts to my tuition bill?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

There will not be any discounts to the tuition bill for graduate students.  Because every graduate student has been invited to campus for the full academic year, tuition charges will not be discounted.

Does the Graduate School have a fund for students experiencing financial hardship due to COVID-19?

-Updated 4/9/2021-

Enrolled graduate students with financial need who are suffering hardship related to COVID‐19 may apply to the Graduate Student Hardship Fund, administered by the Graduate School. These funds are intended for financial hardship related to COVID‐19, and are not intended to cover costs that would otherwise have been incurred, such as tuition and fees, housing, regular rent, etc. Students who have been required to adjust dissertation research topics as a result of restrictions on travel and limited access to fieldwork or materials can also request support. Appropriate research-related requests may include increased internet support, new or different research materials, subscriptions, and books. We have also expanded our COVID-19 hardship funding support to help cover transportation costs related to obtaining the vaccine (including rental car and ride sharing service costs).

Students may qualify for assistance with the following (but not limited to) categories:

•            Emergency COVID-related relocation/travel costs 

•            Assistance moving back to campus after relocating due to pandemic

•            Storage and moving fees

•            Food insecurity

•            Medical/household supplies (i.e. masks, cleaning goods, gloves, etc.)

•            Technology and research needs

•            Transportation costs related to obtaining the COVID-19 vaccine (including rental care and ride sharing)

We generally do not fund requests within the following categories:

•            Standard rent requests

•            Summer/semester stipend requests

•            Tuition and fees (including DCE fees)

•            Lost wages

•            Personal or elective travel

•            Support of extended family member expenses (non-dependent)

•            Incoming first-year transition to campus

To apply for the COVID Hardship Funding, please submit the following form.

 

I am an incoming student for Spring 2020. What forms do I need to complete in order to receive my January pay?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

The forms that you need to complete will depend upon where you are physically located at the start of classes on February 1.

Students located within the United States
You must complete the I-9 form by January 20thin order to be guaranteed your January payment at the end of the month. If you complete the form after this date, your payment may be delayed. If you do not receive a payment in the first pay cycle, you will receive it mid-February when we will be running a second pay cycle. In the interim, if delay of your January pay poses a financial hardship, you may apply for a Graduate Advance. You can find the application form here. The Graduate Advance is available to students who are coping with unexpected financial emergencies. It is an advance of your stipend at no interest. The amount of the Graduate Advance will be posted to your Student Account, and it will be repaid automatically through deductions from future stipend checks. Completion of the I-9 is required in order to be eligible for the Graduate Advance.

For questions on completing the I-9 form, please email gsadmit@princeton.edu.

Students located outside the United States and approved for continued  Remote Study
You must complete the International Assignment Form by January 20th. There is additional processing required for this form, so completion in a timely manner is important. If you complete the form after January 20th, you will not receive a payment in the first pay cycle. However, we will be running a second pay cycle in mid-February. In the interim, if delay of your January pay poses a financial hardship, you may apply for a Graduate Advance. You can find the application form here. The Graduate Advance is available to students who are coping with unexpected financial emergencies. It is an advance of your stipend at no interest. The amount of the Graduate Advance will be posted to your Student Account, and it will be repaid automatically through deductions from future stipend checks. Completion of the International Assignment Form is required in order to be eligible for the Graduate Advance.

For questions on completing the International Assignment form, please email gsadmit@princeton.edu.

If your funding is from an assistantship in instruction or assistantship in research, we request additional information. There are considerations for work conducted outside the United States. We ask you to complete this survey, so that we can best support you. 

Health & Wellness

Where can I find public health guidance regarding COVID-19?

-Updated 12/15/2020-

Resources include the Princeton University Spring 2021 websitethe Princeton University COVID-19 website, as well as the Environmental Health and Safety website.

Is there required asymptomatic testing for Covid-19 for graduate students?

-Updated 3/4/2021-

Yes, there is mandatory asymptomatic testing for all grad students who meet any of the below testing criteria. Please see the University's policy for more details. 

  • Are physically on campus for 8 or more hours on a weekly basis
  • Live in University housing
  • Attend an in-person class of any duration

The Office of the Dean of the Graduate School will monitor testing compliance and follow steps of progressive discipline for any graduate student found to be willfully out of compliance or neglectful with adhering to the University’s COVID-19 testing protocol. The range of penalties for violations include those found in Rights, Rules, Responsibilities .

There are legitimate reasons for “non-compliance” which will not be treated as discipline issues.  Examples include but are not be limited to: a student who misses being COVID-19 tested because they were away that week, were sick, or otherwise were not on campus for 8 hours that week. Nonetheless, non-compliance will require follow-up and review to determine if legitimate or not, and then if not legitimate, the discipline procedures will be followed.

DAILY SYMPTOM CHECK

All graduate students must complete the Daily Symptom Check each day before they come to campus or enter a University building that is not their residence. They do not need to complete the Daily Symptom Check if they are not planning to be in University buildings, such as staying in their dormitory or other on campus housing.

The new Daily Symptom Check requires login with your NetID and password, with dual authentication via DUO. The new system has a compliance feature that sends a reminder if you enter a University building without completing a Daily Symptom Check and notifies the Graduate School if you still do not complete it. The system also alerts Environmental Health and Safety if a person enters a University building after being advised by the app to stay home.

How to Access and Use the Daily Symptom Check

The new app is located in the same place in TigerSafe as the previous Daily Symptom Check. Open TigerSafe, select Daily Symptom Check, and press the Daily Symptom Check button. If you prefer to use a tablet or computer, go to https://tinyurl.com/PrincetonSymptomCheckApp. See Daily Symptom Check on the EHS website for more information, including screenshots of the system.

After logging into the app, if you have none of the symptoms listed, select No and submit. You will receive a message with a green checkmark and message informing you that you are free to enter University buildings. If you select Yes, you will be prompted to answer additional questions about your symptoms, including whether any of the symptoms are related to a chronic or confirmed condition for which you are being treated. Graduate students may be informed that they should contact University Health Services if they are experiencing symptoms. 

Your result may indicate that you should stay home and will provide additional instructions and guidance. Entering a University building is an attestation that you do not have symptoms related to COVID-19. See Daily Symptom Check on the EHS website for more information, including screenshots of the system.

If you are unable to access the Daily Symptom Check with a smartphone, tablet, or computer, you may use the paper form.

 Use of the Daily Symptom Check ensures compliance with New Jersey Executive Order 192 for faculty, staff, and researchers, and ensures compliance with New Jersey Restart Standards for higher education for undergraduate and graduate students. 

 

SELF-REPORT COVID TESTING ABSENCE

The Self-Report COVID Testing Absence Form allows individuals who participate in the COVID-19 asymptomatic screening program to report ahead of time that they will miss one or more tests, and the reasons for missing testing. Therefore, graduate students are asked to complete this form as soon as they know they will be missing required on-campus testing. Responses to this form will be integrated into the weekly testing compliance report that the Graduate School receives.

Accessing and Using the Self-Report COVID Testing Absence Form

The form is available in the TigerSafe app and on the web. From the TigerSafe app, select Testing Kit and choose the Report a Testing Absence option. Alternatively, from any internet browser, go to https://tinyurl.com/PrincetonTestAbsence.

 Log in with your Princeton University NetID and password. Enter the start and end dates of your absence from testing, and select the reason for the absence. See the Report a Testing Absence web page for more information, including screenshots.

What resources exist for Health & Wellness issues related to COVID-19?

If you are experiencing any COVID-related symptoms, please call University Health Services UHS) at (609) 258-3141.

    Access the University Health Services COVID-19 Information Here.

     If you’re feeling stressed and would like to talk about it, please reach out to Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) to set up a virtual appointment with a counselor. If you need to speak with someone immediately, call CPS at any time: 609-258-3141. If you are experiencing an emergency, please call 911 immediately.

    Please also see the following resource regarding taking care of your mental health provided by UHS.

     

    What changes to the Student Health Plan (SHP) have been made in response to COVID-19?

    Information on updates to the Student Health Plan (SHP) in response to COVID-19 can be found here.

    What resources exist for graduate students experiencing health-related financial hardships?

    Any graduate students who experience health-related financial hardship are eligible to apply to the Medical Hardship Fund.

    What is the COVID-19 Leave Policy and where can I find more information?

    In addition to the ten days ordinarily available for illness or other personal matters, in academic year 2020-21 graduate students will be eligible for 14 COVID-19 days during this global health pandemic. These COVID-19 days are intended to assist graduate students who are temporarily unable to fulfill their responsibilities either on campus or remotely, because of hardships directly related to COVID-19. These could range from direct health effects of COVID-19 itself to other consequences, such as childcare issues caused by school closings or the need to care for a dependent who is impacted by COVID-19.

    Students who must be absent due to COVID-19 for longer than 14 days may be eligible for a separate short-term accommodation through the Graduate School or may request a leave of absence from the University. If a student holds an external fellowship whose terms may conflict with this policy, the student should consult first with the director of graduate studies or adviser.

    The COVID-19 leave policy for the 2020-21 academic year is available here.

    Housing & Dining

    Will I be able to move into my assigned housing in Spring 2021?

    -Updated 12/14/20-

    Yes, housing assignments will remain as issued. Questions on housing assignments can be addressed to askhousing@princeton.edu.

    What are the quarantine and isolation guidelines if I will be returning to on-campus housing?

    -Updated 3/25/2021-

    • All incoming and returning graduate students to campus housing will be required to complete the Covid-19 Risk Assessment form 3-7 days before arriving on campus. If you have been vaccinated, you will be prompted to upload your vaccine certificate for consideration of quarantine exemption.
    • Both students currently returning to campus from an international destination, as well as students returning from high risk states (NJ Travel advisory link: Are there travel restrictions to or from New Jersey? | FAQ (nj.gov), must quarantine for 10 days after arriving in New Jersey. This advisory is updated regularly. If this advisory is still in effect in late August, students arriving to campus at that time from one of these states may be asked to quarantine in their room/residence for 10 days, unless other arrival protocols are required based on updated public health guidance.
    • The COVID-19 Risk Assessment form should be completed during the week prior to your return to campus (not before that week).  After reviewing your COVID-19 Risk Assessment, University Health Services (UHS) will notify you if you need to quarantine or not. If you are required to quarantine, UHS will notify you of the length of time you are required to quarantine and will provide instructions for self-quarantining.  
    • If you are required to self-quarantine and you will live at the Graduate College, in a Graduate Annex*, or are living in residence as a Residential Graduate Student, you will self-quarantine in your assigned residence. Dining Services will be in contact with you and will provide you meal services for the duration of your quarantine period. A member of the Graduate School will reach out to you to offer support.
    • If you are required to self-quarantine and you will live in Lakeside, Lawrence or 27-29 Edwards apartments, the expectation is that you will be able to self-quarantine in your apartment by following some simple hygiene guidelines. Dining Services will reach out to you should you require a box of non-perishable food items to sustain you during your quarantine period. A member of the Graduate School will reach out to you to offer support.

    *Graduate Annexes include: 11, 15, 16 and 24 Dickinson Street, 35 and 45 University Place, 31 Edwards Place

    Please see the Princeton COVID Website for additional information regarding quarantine and isolation guidelines: https://covid.princeton.edu/quarantine-isolation

    What are the quarantine and isolation guidelines if I currently live in on-campus housing?

    -Updated 12/1/20-

    • If you are experiencing any COVID-19 related symptoms, please call University Health Services UHS) at (609) 258-3141.
       
    • If you are asked to go to UHS for COVID-19 testing and you currently live at Lakeside, Lawrence or 27-29 Edwards apartments, you will be asked to notify your roommates right away that you will be tested for COVID-19 (you’ll need to get the verbal consent of your roommates for you to self-isolate in the apartment, otherwise, we can provide you temporary housing on campus for your isolation period and meal services). After taking the test, you will receive self-isolation instructions, a care package and you will return to your apartment unless you express the need for temporary housing for self-isolation. Dining Services will reach out to you should you require a box of non-perishable food items to sustain you during the isolation period in your apartment. If you tested positive for COVID-19 via the asymptomatic testing protocol, you will be advised to self-isolate in your apartment providing that you have received verbal consent from roommates to self-isolate in the apartment, otherwise, you will be required to self-isolate in one of the University facilities identified for self-isolation. If roommates change their mind (does not consent to student to self-isolated in the apartment) then isolating student will be provided isolation housing. A member of the Graduate School will reach out to you and your roommates if they are identified as needing to quarantine through contact tracing to offer support. You will receive a survey to assess your symptoms daily, and based on your responses a UHS clinician may check in on you by phone; also, you will be notified once your test results are available.
       
    • For information regarding self-isolation for students who are required to isolate and information for roommates (UHS will notify roommates whether they are required to self-quarantine or not based on contact tracing), please visit: https://www.princeton.edu/content/covid-19-coronavirus-faqs-graduate-stu... 
       
    • If you are asked to go to UHS for COVID-19 testing and you currently live at the Graduate College, Annex, or RGS residence, you will be asked to bring at least five to seven days of clothing, toiletries, any personal devices/chargers and medication with you to your UHS appointment. Following the COVID-19 test, you will receive self-isolation instructions, a care package and you will receive housing and meal services at a designated location on campus for the duration of your isolation period. A member of the G+CH team will be in contact with you for contact tracing – your close contacts will be notified to quarantine while your information will be kept confidential. A member of the Graduate School will reach out to you to check in and offer support. You will receive a survey to assess your symptoms daily, and based on your responses a UHS clinician may check in on you by phone; also, you will be notified once your COVID-19 test results are available.
       
    • If you are identified as a close contact of someone who is tested for COVID-19 you would need to quarantine. Please refer to the self-quarantining information noted above in this communication.
    What if I have a pet or assistance animal and I am required to go to isolation housing or I am isolating in my on-campus apartment and there is no one in my apartment who can care for my animal?
    • Please note that graduate students who must move to “isolation housing” other than their permanent housing assignment after receiving a positive COVID test, will not be permitted to take their animal with them to the isolation housing.
       
    • You should have a local emergency contact in place who can temporarily take your animal and care for your animal while you are in isolation housing. An emergency contact can be another graduate student in a pet friendly unit or someone who lives locally off campus.
       
    • When a graduate student becomes aware that they must move to temporary housing for isolation, the student needs to notify their emergency contact right away and then call DPS to provide DPS the name and phone number of their emergency contact to permit them to enter the student’s unit to retrieve the animal. DPS will check with the on call Dean to verify that DPS may allow your emergency contact into your unit to retrieve your animal. With the on call Dean’s approval, DPS will then provide your emergency contact access into the student’s unit to retrieve the animal. This same process applies if you are allowed to isolate in your on-campus apartment and there is no one in your apartment who can care for your animal.
       
    • If a student does not have an emergency contact, the student should then contact Princeton Animal Control. Princeton Animal Control can make arrangements for the care of the dog or cat until the student returns to their permanent housing assignment and is able to care for the animal. The student should then call DPS and let DPS know that they arranged with Princeton Animal Control to pick up their dog or cat. DPS will check with the on call Dean to verify that they may allow Princeton Animal Control into your unit to retrieve your animal. With the on call Dean’s approval, DPS will then provide Princeton Animal Control access into the student’s unit to retrieve the animal. Princeton Animal control may board the animal at local facilities such as the SAVE animal shelter (https://savehomelessanimals.org/animal-adoption/). The cost for retrieval/boarding the animal will be the responsibility of the student and could fall in the range of $20 per day. When the student is cleared to return to their permanent housing and can care for the animal, the student must call Princeton Animal Control (Jim Ferry, Animal control officer #3163, Princeton Health Department, 609-924-2728) to arrange for payment and return of animal to campus. Students with financial hardship can apply for covid related emergency funding.

     

    Where can I go for information about Dining and Meal Plans?

    -Updated 12/14/20-

    Please visit the Princeton Campus Dining website for the latest meal schedule details and information regarding the Emergency Winter Meal Plan

    What should I do if I have a housing contract and I will not be returning to campus or will be leaving campus this Spring due to COVID-19?

    -Updated 12/14/20-

    Graduate students who will not be coming back to campus or who will be leaving campus have the following options for a current housing contract:

    1. Cancel the housing contract – there will be no cancellation charges to do so.  Students can reapply for housing at any time should they need to return campus in the Spring 2021 semester.  Housing should be available for those who apply, although location and unit type cannot be guaranteed.  If not returning to campus housing until Fall 2021, a student will enter the Room Draw process in the spring.
    2. If you are a returning student (this option is not applicable to first year students) you can find a temporary resident and apply for them to occupy your apartment space while you are away from campus for a minimum of one month up to the end of the current contract period.  Details for this option can be found here
    3. Keep your current contract and continue to pay the room or apartment rate as indicated on the contract.

    Housing will continue  to work with individual students and answer any questions that you may have regarding these options and graduate housing. Please send an email to askhousing@princeton.edu so that we can better assist you and your specific situation.

    What is the guest policy for graduate students in on-campus housing?

    Please see the below links for the most up to date info from Housing & Real Estate Services regarding the graduate student on-campus housing guest policy.

    Guest Policy for Apartment Contract Holders

    Guest Policy for Graduate College and Annex Contract Holders

    Student Organizations & Activities

    Are student groups permitted hold in person events and/or activities?

    -Updated 12/11/20-

    Definitions: Activities refers to meetings, events, and planned assembly of individuals, held indoors or outdoors, sponsored and/or supported by the University

    Virtual Activities

    Student organizations are permitted and encouraged to host virtual events and activities where possible. As a reminder, all virtual events/activities must be registered by completing the online Events Registration Form.

    In-Person Activities

    Graduate students and graduate student organizations may now submit requests for in-person gatherings through the EMS web app https://scheduling.princeton.edu. This change is on a trial basis and may be amended as needed.

    The University Gatherings Team will review and approve, if appropriate public health measures are in place, requests for gatherings of greater than 5 people indoors and greater than 20 people outdoors that support a student’s progress towards a degree or a student’s health and well-being, or are deemed critical to the mission of the University.

    The Graduate School will review and approve, if appropriate public health measures are in place, requests for gatherings of less than 5 people indoors and less than 20 people outdoors that support a student’s progress towards a degree or a student’s health and well-being, or are deemed critical to the mission of the University.

    Can student groups reserve space on campus?

    -Updated 12/11/20-

    Graduate students and graduate student organizations may requests spaces for in-person gatherings through the EMS web app https://scheduling.princeton.edu. This change is on a trial basis and may be amended as needed.

    Is funding available for programming?

    Student organizations are permitted to use their finances for approved virtual or in-person group activity. Student organizations may continue to request funding from the GSG Events Board for approved events.

    Can I start a new student organization?

    The recognition of new student organizations will continue with no change to the recognition process.  

    Travel

    My academic work requires that I travel.  Is this allowed?

    Currently all University-sponsored research travel is prohibited, and all personal travel is discouraged.  Until this changes, you should not plan to travel, and you may need to discuss adjusting research timelines or research topics with your adviser(s).

    Further information about travel guidelines can be found on the University's COVID-19 Information Page.

    I am an international student. Where can I find regular updates on travel restrictions and the global travel landscape?

    We recognize there may be additional challenges facing international students with regard to travel to the U.S. and that some students may be unable to come to campus in the spring semester due to visa issues or travel restrictions. The Davis International Center posts regular updates on restrictions and the global travel landscape and is making every effort to share information as soon as it becomes available in order to assist international students. For specific questions, graduate students should reach out to the Davis Center.

    For additional information, consult the International Princeton website

    International Graduate Students

    Where can I find regular updates on travel restrictions and the global travel landscape?

    -Updated 12/18/2020-

    We recognize there may be additional challenges facing international students with regard to travel to the U.S. and that some students may be unable to come to campus in the fall due to visa issues or travel restrictions. The Davis International Center posts regular updates on restrictions and the global travel landscape and is making every effort to share information as soon as it becomes available in order to assist international students. For specific questions, graduate students should reach out to the Davis Center.

    Please also consult the University's Spring 2021 page for further guidance.

    For additional information, consult the International Princeton website.

    Libraries

    Where can I find the latest information about accessing a Princeton library via on-site services and/or remote resources?

    Please visit the Princeton University Library website for the latest communications containing information on the phased resumption of on-site services and updates about remote resources.

    Teaching & AI Appointments

    I’m serving as an AI this spring. Am I required to teach in person?

    -New 12/18/2020-

    A small number of undergraduate courses are expected to have an in-person component.  Just as faculty are not required to teach in person, graduate students are also not required to teach in person if they are not comfortable doing so.  The Graduate School will contact all graduate students appointed to in-person teaching roles to ensure they are taking the position voluntarily.

    If undergraduate courses will primarily be taught online again for the spring semester, how do I prepare to teach online?

    -Updated 12/18/2020-

    For first-time AIs, the McGraw Center’s mandatory AI Orientation for the spring semester will be held virtually in the month of January and will include resources for online teaching. Your graduate program administrator is your point of contact for registering for this orientation.  For all AIs, new and veteran, the McGraw Center has developed valuable resources for teaching online.  Additionally, the McGraw Center will offer workshops, learning forums, and consultations in preparation for and during the spring semester.

    How large will the precepts or sections be in undergraduate courses taught online?

    The number of students you teach as an AI in a precept or section will vary depending on decisions that departments and programs make about the right sizes for their various courses.  In most cases, however, the number of students in an online precept or section is likely to be fewer than 10. This may result in additional AI opportunities for graduate students who are seeking funding support in their later years of enrollment or who are seeking additional teaching experience.

    Will the time commitment and/or pay associated with an AI assignment change?

    No. Your AI financial support will be coordinated with any other financial support that you are receiving from the University. Should there be an increase in the number of AI hours assigned to you as a result of the undergraduate plan, your AI pay would be adjusted accordingly and coordinated with University support.  No graduate student may be assigned more than 6 AI hours in a semester, which is considered a full AI appointment and provides a full stipend at the AI rate.  Because of adjustments to the number of students in most precepts and sections, each AI hour appointment should continue to represent approximately three hours of work per week: one contact hour with students plus approximately two hours of preparation and assessment time.  A full AI appointment of 6 AI hours should typically not exceed 18 to 20 hours of work per week. If you find that you are being asked to devote more time than is reasonable, you should discuss this with the faculty member with whom you teach and/or your DGS.  Academic Affairs staff in the Graduate School can offer an additional review of your situation as necessary.

    If some precepts or sections may be scheduled to accommodate undergraduates in different time zones, will I be asked to teach at unusual times?

    This will depend on the course and the students in it.  Departments and programs have been instructed to discuss any unusual times with AIs to make sure they are comfortable with teaching outside of ordinary hours before they are assigned them.  In all cases departments and programs should avoid asking an AI to teach between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. local to where the AI is for the fall semester.

    I have questions about technology to support teaching as an Assistant in Instruction. Where can I find answers to questions about technology and resources that are available?

    The Office of Information Technology (OIT) provides answers to questions frequently asked by graduate students about technology resources available to them in support of teaching as an Assistant in Instruction (AI). You can find FAQs and answers specific to graduate students on the OIT website. The questions and answers also address changes to IT services and resources for Spring 2021 that are a result of Covid-19 social distancing guidelines.

    On-Campus and Virtual Resources for Graduate Students

    Contact Information

    Clio Hall Princeton, NJ 08544
    Phone: 609-258-3030
    Fax: 609-258-6180
    Office Hours: 8:45 a.m.–5 p.m. (regular hours); 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. (summer hours)

    *Please note that, as described in the resource section, as well as in communications from the Graduate School archived on this site, your first point of contact on many questions will be your department.*

    Points of Contact for Graduate Students in the Humanities and Social Sciences

    Points of Contact for Graduate Students in Engineering and Natural Sciences

    Finances and Administration Contacts for all Graduate Students

    • Mary Bechler

        • Senior Associate Dean for Finance and Administration
      • Phone: 609-258-7510
      • Email: mbechler@princeton.edu
    • Jeanette DeGuire

    • Lisa Franzman

    • Matthew Gundy

    • Jacqueline Knowlton

        • Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration
      • Phone: 609-258-1999
      • Email: jjk3@princeton.edu
    • Meghan Krause